Then I was the remnant of a tale (for Carver)

It is a nothing day, a gray day,
a throwaway day and I
have disappeared into a crack
in the sofa with all those
forgotten things,
a no-man.

I have dream-drafts to send
me off, sounds of the dryer
and the clock, reminding
tics of all that’s undone,
all that needs cleaned.

I have finished the book,
its pages uneven
and soft: to think, our words
could kill so many trees,
our photo tattooed
on the back. He writes so real
it’s like life, I don’t want it
to end — it needs to be saved.

And when I’m done a small
part of me is gone, another dream
I won’t remember on a nothing
day. The writer breathed his
last words into me and gave
me song: said live while you’ve
got the chance, get up.

Raymond Carver shot from my iPhone

Raymond Carver shot from my iPhone

About pinklightsabre

William Pearse publishes memoir, travel journals, poetry and prose, and lives in the Pacific Northwest.
This entry was posted in poetry and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

13 Responses to Then I was the remnant of a tale (for Carver)

  1. That hits the feeling of leaving a loved book on the nose. (I tried to avoid a cliche but hitting something on the cheek, or nipple, or shoulder just didn’t get it done.)

    Liked by 1 person

    • pinklightsabre says:

      Cliches are always welcome, Jon. Thanks for reading and glad it hit you on the nail or the coffin or “hit home,” as it were. Cheers and pleasant night to you and yours. – Bill

      Like

  2. alesiablogs says:

    Hey Bill,
    good post!

    Like

  3. I love that guy’s work. It means a lot to me. I’m a low-level rare book dealer and collector and I have a shelf of signed first editions by him. I hadn’t read any of his stuff for years and I recently picked Cathedral up off the shelf and reread it. His stuff still does it to me. Its impact hasn’t faded a bit. Imagine my relief.

    Like

    • pinklightsabre says:

      I just lent my friend Cathedral (the one I was out with making rock sculptures etc.). My wife and I were shocked and amazed when we walked into the Birdman film and the Carver premise revealed itself, and we had just been talking about him on our V-Day date at a bar prior, and there you go: more Carver. And she had said he reminded her of Chekhov, and in this collection I have by Tess Gallagher, there you go: Chekhov passages amid the Carver. Very neat. Thanks for reading, Mark.

      Like

  4. rossmurray1 says:

    I really need to read more Carver. This is great, though. As Jon said, it could apply to many books. Years, even weeks later, I sometimes remember the feel of books more than their plots, like dreams.

    Like

    • pinklightsabre says:

      I don’t seem to remember plots really but the feel, as you say. It’s so clarifying to read his stories and not feel like there’s any muck attached to them.

      Like

  5. Tish Farrell says:

    All that sense of being stranded between things undone, and that feeling of loss when a book is finished and a powerful connection disconnected; a loss of power – a throwaway day. I know those. I won’t think of them piling up in landfill though 🙂

    Like

    • pinklightsabre says:

      Yes, a friend of mine mailed this book to me and it was just the thing to give me a shot of inspiration and some relief from another book that’s weighing me down. Glad you connected with the sentiment too, Tish — cheers, enjoy the evening. – Bill

      Like

  6. rossmurray1 says:

    You’ve lost your “share” buttons, it looks like. Is that on purpose?

    Like

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