How it felt before the storm

Storm clouds advance on Oban Bay

Storm clouds advance on Oban Bay

Though the storm had started I took Ginger for a walk. It was raining harder than you can imagine, and the frogs were going nuts — like a scene from the bible announcing something auspicious, or maybe they just wanted to mate.

The rain brought all the leaves down like that, like the drawstring on a lamp clicked off. The leaves did faceplants on the pavement, the Japanese Maples, their stems like umbrella sticks turned up, five-fingered hands, some of them curling inwards, some you’d be inclined to save.

But Ginger is unbothered by the rain, sniffs and squats, it’s how dogs interact with the world, through their nose, and reminds me of us and our blogs, sniffing vague territories, squatting: what’s unique about each of us and readily identified, what’s inside.

There’s no one at the lake, no surprise. They hauled off the felled cedars and left the dust like a murder mystery scene, the outline fading in the rain, taped off. I think about work, how I can do it from home, my two laptops and three aliases, my BlueTooth enabled high-end speaker from Bristol and my mobile phone, a ‘4.’ How nothing’s ever as simple as you expect it to be with work.

It’s Paul Simon’s birthday today and he’s 75; I thank him as one of the people who inspired me to write, and remember the day I wrote his lyrics in my journal, age 16, this time of year – how the hillsides looked different for the first time, the wonder of something simple made marvelous, just because.

Dawn asked if I could test the generator and like everyone else, I’m going to the store now.

About pinklightsabre

William Pearse publishes memoir, travel journals, poetry and prose, and lives in the Pacific Northwest.
This entry was posted in musings, writing and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

32 Responses to How it felt before the storm

  1. byebyebeer says:

    It started raining here just after I started reading this (true story). I tell you what, I can’t write like you do but you sure make me take notice of the things going on around. Your physical descriptions are magnificent. Hope you don’t wind up needing to use that generator.

    Liked by 2 people

    • pinklightsabre says:

      Don’t let those negative constructions limit your writing lady! Thanks for the well wishes and nice words, though. If you get the generator working it’s like Murphy’s Law, you won’t need it. It’s a stark scenario having to kick that thing on, I tell you. But a godsend to have, when you need it. I mean who could live without their Christmas lights going, you know?

      Like

    • kingmidget says:

      And it’s about to start raining here. Rain which will last for the next three days. Coincidence? I think not. Mr. PinkLightSabre’s beautiful description is starting something for all of us.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. dave ply says:

    Auspicious for the frogs, one way or the other. I wonder if, in a week or so, even the frogs will be flagging down an ark.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. lisakunk says:

    As a Hurricane Matthew survivor and rescuer of my 88 year old mother from the flood zone in eastern NC, I can appreciate storm stories. Our dogs do NOT want to go out to do their business. We force them against their will. I can’t imagine what the people in Lumberton NC do about their dogs basic needs. Due to flooded roads between Charlotte and the coast, we can’t get Mom back to her home. For many, the three hour trip is taking 6 to 8 hours and gas is iffy. Not worth the risk.

    Liked by 1 person

    • pinklightsabre says:

      Hi Lisa — yeah, mine is no storm story here by comparison, mine is more like crying wolf. Yours is remarkable, and I can imagine how hard it would be to influence your mom to move like that. And the gas thing…I just went and got some myself, but we so rarely need it, I hate having it lie around and go bad. In the PNW where I live, we get wind storms normally in November (this is early) and of course, there’s the odd risk of volcano/tsunami, but that’s it. I lived through a 6.8 earthquake in 2001 that was pretty awful, but that’s my worst war story. It’s funny how people, myself included, get ourselves spun up over these things. There’s a palpable ‘pre-storm’ vibe and it’s setting in here, now. Nothing like Matthew, but our version of low simmer panic. Thanks for reading and sharing your story. Bill

      Like

  4. ksbeth says:

    there is something about storms that i just love and that picture is pretty good too.

    Like

    • pinklightsabre says:

      I know right? Nothing like west coast of Scotland in November with a storm expected. That was last year, though. Glad you like the photo Beth.

      Like

  5. walt walker says:

    Reminds me a of Lips lyric:

    I’m lookin’ at the sky
    I’m waitin’ on the rain
    I’m waitin’ for the frogs to fall
    Down on me

    I agree with Kristen’s first comment up above.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. rossmurray1 says:

    I once read how Paul Simon was ever the lyricist Dylan is but never gets the same respect. Suppose today, on his birthday, he’s thinking, “Bastard.”

    Liked by 1 person

    • pinklightsabre says:

      He is smooth like caramel, that guy. They played Mrs Robinson on the radio and it probably inspired me to write today. I realized I was his age now 30 years ago when I first got into him. I can’t make any comparisons between those two; I love them both. Suspect Paul would be better company around the fireplace though.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Yes, your Washington Washer has made it’s way to us down here, and we’re encamped with a dog and two of the neighbor’s cats. I always get uneasy when I see water pouring over the edge of the gutters, but it was too soon to get them cleaned out. Shoot!

    Funny you mention Paul Simon, because I was just thinking of all the possible songwriters who could be up for a Nobel one of these days. Simon’s one for sure. Leonard Cohen maybe?

    Liked by 1 person

    • pinklightsabre says:

      I heard yesterday Leonard said he’s ready to die, that’s it, not too much pain just wants to go. Ready. Very “Leonard.”

      Like

  8. Pingback: How it felt before the storm — William Pearse | pinklightsabre – MobsterTiger

Please share your thoughts!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s