No Christmas in Germany (15 Décembre)

December 15, 2017
Colmar, France

We tipped big, smiled and said please a lot our short time here in Colmar. A family of Spanish tourists at the café were practicing English with their two little boys and before we left I walked over to them and complimented the boy on his English. They asked where I was from, I took off my hat and said America (I wanted to make a good impression). After some wine with lunch, Dawn and I got sentimental and both decided we wanted to bring our kids and my mom here, to Colmar. There are five Christmas markets interconnected through medieval roads in this small French town that looks German, combines the best of the two cultures, I think. So we made arrangements to book another place for Sunday, we’re leaving today for Germany, then returning to Colmar tomorrow with the whole family. I have a recipe for coq au vin that calls for white Alsatian wine vs. the usual red, so we may do that Sunday.

About pinklightsabre

William Pearse publishes memoir, travel journals, poetry and prose, and lives in the Pacific Northwest.
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12 Responses to No Christmas in Germany (15 Décembre)

  1. Tish Farrell says:

    Looks just the place for pre-xmas atmosphere. Have a great weekend.

    Liked by 1 person

    • pinklightsabre says:

      Thanks Tish – is it true, you’re getting snow in your parts? It would appear that way from some of your recent photos. Kind of beats cold rain, I’ll say. Yes, I would really recommend Colmar if you’ve not been or would be interested in visiting these parts. Dawn said that it’s won the “top 5” Christmas markets in Europe every year for a few years now. And funny, it’s one the top 5 and has a total of 5 Christmas markets in the town, all walkable, has won all 5 places. We’re going back there today for one more night. Bill

      Liked by 1 person

      • Tish Farrell says:

        We have had astonishing snow here, after having little or none for years. It’s on its last legs today though. Warmer weather coming our way. Hope you all have a wonderful time in Colmar today. Shall put it on my ‘to go to’ list for France 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • pinklightsabre says:

        Don’t come on a Sunday in high season..:case of the monkey’s paw tale for us, trying to relive a perfect experience. Ah bon, c’est la vie.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. I Google mapped that joint. No wonder it looks like Germany. It’s spitting distance. Remember when you didn’t have to worry about what kind of reaction you were going to get when you told people you were from America?

    Liked by 1 person

    • pinklightsabre says:

      Mark! Hi, thanks for looking up Colmar – glad you did, it’s a really neat place. I’d never heard of it before, either. We’re going back today for another night; it’s just a few hours from where we’re staying in Germany. I’m happy you picked up on the political part of the post, thanks for pointing that out. Was a bit of a poignant moment for me but I didn’t want to overdo it. Bill

      Like

      • It’s a long time ago that i read this history, but hasn’t this region changed hands between France and Germany an extraordinary number of times over the years/centuries?

        Like

      • pinklightsabre says:

        I believe it has changed hands a number of times, it would appear so. Same for another town north from there where we have friends, Metz. I like the blending aspect. Makes me sad to think they may need to reinstate those checkpoints along the borders some day.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. What I love about Europe: that wine from the Alsace is Alsation.
    What drives me crazy about Europe: that a recipe demands wine from a particular region.

    This post reminded me of standing around a church in Strasbourg awaiting the chiming of an old clock with figures and movement and eating lapin at an outdoor restaurant by a canal. Probably cooked in Gerwurztraminer.

    Like

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