When someone great is gone

There is a dip in the yard where a large root sack rotted out a long time ago. It sunk more and more until we got nervous and had to call someone out to look at it. But it was just the remains of a big old tree cut down and the space it needed to take root. You could try to picture what it was like, standing in a grove with the others so tall. I dug and dug to see what I could find but it was only earth, no caverns or underground streams. And set about the task of filling it in, planting grass seed, watering it, trimming the new grass to make it blend in with the rest of the lawn. And is it like that when you lose someone? You look at the space they occupied and it never seems right again. The earth has a gap, the circumference of something mighty cut down, removed. You look at the same scene you always did but can’t unsee the aberration in the frame. Or remember what it was like before.



Categories: prose, writing

Tags: ,

27 replies

  1. This hits home. Especially your last 2 observations – what’s clearly missing refuses complete recall – keeps me on edge!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I love this analogy. The fragments of the old root system take years and years to dissolve away, so you’re always running across new holes and sunken places. Just as you realize the last person who knew how to re-start the furnace is gone, or who could fill in the gaps in your memory of family history — so those events, stories and personalities will dissolve away too.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I love what you said Robert! Thanks for sharing that, happy it resonated with you. I lifted the title from a song by LCD Soundsystem too, in case that’s your thing. It’s catchy as all get out. And odd to have a catchy tune about loss, but there you go.

      Liked by 2 people

  3. Stumped; Ashes.

    (A cricketing analogy).

    Liked by 1 person

  4. The Ashes is a commemorative game of cricket between Australia and UK where the trophy is the ashes of the burnt stumps from a game played in 1882.
    We work hard to keep memories alive even if they are but the dust of the glorious original.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Unfortunately, I’m off to get a Covid test. F’it.
    Surely just a common cold but I have had to cancel work (which is with vulnerable clients).

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ah shit, sorry to hear that. You’re into the thick of cold season there now with the seasons turning over. They’ll be happy when you’re back and negative!

      Like

  6. Plenty of time to listen to “When someone great is gone” whilst waiting in the queue. Not familiar but looking forward to it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Lovely! Enjoy. Oh the world of technology right? Everything a touch away it seems

      Like

      • Yes, but part reason for my slow responding this morning is due to replacing power board which blew with too many IT-gadgets plugged in plus heater in the backroom where I’m ‘isolating’.

        Like

      • Ah brother. Isolating. That sucks. The “mother board,” always found that a funny term.

        Like

  7. A good reason to listen to some Leonard Cohen when I return.
    Off to join the queue now.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Covid test done, ‘Someone great’ playef whilst waiting. Great choice. Now back home for my ‘Coffee test’. It “isn’t even bitter”.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. I’ve long thought that the loss of someone leaves a scar, but now I can add that it also creates a space to be filled and resown with new grass to match the old. The loss will always be there but so will whatever comes next.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Well put, the scar is apt too. It’s weird, in my limited experience with loss of a real loved one I find the inability to remember them wholly is most strange. Hard to put words to but I’ve at least started the conversation with myself! Thanks for reading Christopher.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. I can relate. Even today as we came home via a back street I couldn’t help but notice that void where my giant tree used to be. The stump remains.

    And of others have said, other missing things or people can leave subtle scars as well.

    Liked by 1 person

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